the earth laughs in flowers

+Janine / 15 / INTJ.
classical music enthusiast, barricade girl, potterhead, and dedicated to Audrey Hepburn. I'm okay sometimes.

yungfairy:

coolest hiding place ever

eldestgoose:

BEST MOMENT IN THE WHOLE SERIES

gwenstacye:

favourite movies meme-  Dreams feel real while we’re in them. It’s only when we wake up that we realize something was actually strange.(Inception 2010)

Ladies of Monstrous

American Horror Story : Asylum
If there is a God, He will have to beg my forgiveness.
~A phrase that was carved on the walls of a concentration camp cell during WWII by a Jewish prisoner  (via pale-afternoon)

bethwoodvilles:

Queens of England + Eleanor of Provence (1223-1291)

Eleanor was born in 1223 in Aix-en-Provence, the second daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence and Beatrice of Savoy. She was betrothed to Henry III of England in 1235. Never having been in his kingdom or having met him before the wedding, Eleanor married him in January 1236. She was crowned the same day. All of her three other sisters were married to kings as well.

In her retinue, Eleanor brought many of her relatives to install in important offices which did not endear her to the English people who mistrusted foreigners. She was also disliked by Henry’s barons for her influence on him, and this caused friction throughout his reign. Despite her unpopularity, Eleanor was a loyal and capable consort who was confident in exercising her power. When Henry was captured by his own barons and forced to agree to their terms for reforms, she went to France and raised troops to free him. Her invasion fleet was wrecked before it reached England but her son the future Edward I fought off the rebels and rescued Henry. 

Eleanor remained active in promoting the royal family’s interests after Henry’s death in 1272. She stayed in England and raised several of her grandchildren. It was only fourteen years after Henry’s death that she retired to the nunnery of Amesbury. She lived a quiet and pious life there until her death in 1291. (x)

TINY